Effortless living

A Path to WisdomWe live in a world that is fast paced, noisy and extremely demanding of our time, attention and presence. A world in which people have forgotten who they truly are. Not being in the flow, nor present and not being able to listen to our own intuition has become many peoples default way of being.

Some of the common problems that prevent people from being in the flow of life are: deep rooted fears, limiting beliefs, giving power away, control issues, identity crisis, subordinating to other peoples values, as well as the lack of understanding of the connection of the body, mind, soul, and emotions. Most people are not aware of their fears, triggers and the subconscious programming that prevent them from living balanced, healthy and peaceful life.

Every day we have on average 60,000 to 90,000 thoughts. These thoughts influence how you feel, behave and the outcomes you create. How you feel, informs the decisions you make. Therefore, knowing what thoughts regularly occupy space in your brain and ultimately drive your decisions, is important. Our thoughts are also influenced by the information we let in. It should come as no surprise, living in the era of the 24 hour news cycle, that for most of you, the majority of your thoughts include some kind of doubt, fear and distrust.

Most people operate from some level of fear most of the time, therefore, deciphering between fear and other emotions can be challenging. I find this especially true when it comes to understanding the difference between fear and intuition.

Intuition is a knowing. It is beyond a feeling. It seems to come as guided wisdom from a place deep within our consciousness. Intuition is emotionally neutral and simple, yet deliberate in its message. A dedicated meditation practice, can quiet fearful mind chatter allowing you to hear the voice of your intuition more clearly.

Another great tool that people can learn through learning my unique methodology that I share in my book A Path to Wisdom is to help the reader differentiate the voice of intuition from other voices including the voice of fear.

The way of determining what voice you are hearing, is to pay attention to the tone of the message you are sending or receiving. Fear speaks in a harsh, judgmental tone and may present you with a detailed list of all of the horrible things that might happen. The more familiar you become with the voice of fear inside your mind, the more quickly you can recognize it and shut it down and be in the effortless state of being.

Having worked with many clients I notice how they look away from fear, as over the years for many of them this way of being has become their natural defence against the discomfort of feeling it.

I help and encourage my clients to go through a process in which they lean in instead of pushing away from fear. They learn to listen closely to the messages that the fear gives them and learn how to make their fear their teacher. As they learn how to dance with their fear, they start to experience and enter the realm and the rhythm of miracle living.

The method I have developed that the readers can learn in my book A Path to Wisdom helps people to better distinguish and know the fear voice. As they do, the easier it will be for them to tap into the power of their intuition and effortless living.

9 Therapies: What’s the best emotional release technique?

Guest blog by Dr Lisa Turner
One of the biggest myths portrayed by the media, films and stories is that once you’ve had a traumatic experience, you will be emotionally scarred for life and that the best you can hope for is to learn to live with it, understand it.

However, recent years have brought about a plethora of techniques to release emotions. This list has been put together based on my personal experience of these therapies in my own quest to recover from childhood sexual abuse.

I am walking testament to the fact that emotions CAN be released. Limiting beliefs like “I’m no good / I deserve to be punished” can be released forever.

Here is a list of some of the most popular techniques:

Psychotherapy – Essentially a “talking cure” centring on the client talking through their issues with a therapist. The idea is that talking about your problems and past will give you a better understanding of yourself and raise self-awareness.

Affirmations – Saying positive affirmations might change your state or mood in the short term, but it doesn’t remove limiting beliefs. Also, in order for affirmations to change your state you have to remember to say them.

Psychodrama – This is where you act out painful situations from your past and change them so you can experience something different, like fighting back, feeling more powerful.

EFT – This technique is based on tapping meridians to release the emotion. The tapping points are usually on the face, torso and hands.

EmoTrance – By paying attention to where you feel the emotion in your body, allowing it to soften and flow using attention, the feeling leaves your body and with it, the emotion.

Shamanic Healing – Based on various tribal cultures this uses altered states of consciousness, dream work, energy work and symbolism to change your experience of the physical reality.

NLP Neuro-Linguistic Programming and hypnosis – NLP is a collection of techniques that are based on modelling successful therapists and therapies. I found this amazingly successful at enabling me to access more resources and cope with situations that had previously caused me great anxiety. It’s quick and effective.

Timeline Therapy – TLT is phenomenally powerful and as someone who had been haunted by my past daily, was barely able to function normally, and found even the most ordinary situations traumatic and terrifying. TLT was a miracle.

Higher Self Therapy – This technique is even more effective than Time Line Therapy as it is even quicker and removes emotions at an even deeper level. Whereas TLT removes the emotions from the emotional and mental body, Higher Self Therapy also releases it from a soul or karmic level.

These last two are the ones I now teach to my students and are the ones I recommend most highly. If you have had trauma in the past, even if you are not healed yet, please take this one thing from reading this. YOU CAN RECOVER. All you have to do is decide.

If you have decided, get free instant access to how to recover from abuse, go to www.recoverfromabuse.com

 

Lisa is a Trainer of NLP, Time Line therapy, Hypnosis, NLP Coaching, Shamanic healing and other healing processes. If you have been affected by any of the topics mentioned here contact me via lisaturner@psycademy.co.uk  All information will be treated in the strictest confidence.

My partner is depressed

One of the most difficult aspects of depression is that few people recognise when they are feeling really bad. It often takes someone else close to you to point it out before it registers, but it’s not uncommon for someone with depression to be in denial.  This particularly impacts on partners, who are living with them every day and who know them well enough to recognise the signs.
Immediately this can cause conflict that can lead to relationship problems, and in some cases can result in break up. So how can anyone deal with a depressed partner?

Caroline Carr, hypnotherapist and life coach, has started a website, www.mypartnerisdepressed.com 020 7467 8517 or  01202 731385 to provide guidance to people in this situation. She also offers workshops and consultations, and has an e-book on her website that you can download free of charge.  See at the end of the article for details of a competition to win a free session with Caroline.

Caroline is kindly offering her time to one lucky winner (£500 prize value), either in person in Dorset or London, or through four telephone coaching sessions.To win a session with Caroline please email vitality@pegasuspr.co.uk with the title ‘Healthy Soul competition’  before 31st March 2012.

Caroline has personal experience of this issue, and she says, ‘As a partner you can get emotional shocks because you don’t know what to expect and when. Communication goes wrong between you and you may feel worried, hurt, angry, dejected and eventually you build up resentment.  The main message I give is that this is not the partner’s fault. You need to take an emotional step back from your partner to avoid getting sucked in, or you can find yourself getting depressed as well.’

This is of course much easier said than done, but Caroline teaches people a range of strategies and techniques to help themselves to step back from the situation and avoid become embroiled. ‘You need to stay strong and have your own life. Many people find it hard to be selfish, but you can do this with compassion and kindness as you do have to protect yourself.’

This is particularly important when there are children in the family too.  ‘My advice is to talk to children, making it age appropriate. They pick up on the vibes even if they are very young, and they can feel the hostility and aggression that’s below the surface. As soon as they can understand it’s perfectly acceptable to say, “Mum/Dad is not very well and that’s why they are behaving like that.”  It’s so important that they don’t blame themselves.

‘Depression is so intangible and it eats into every aspect of life.  It can have many causes – something that has happened in the past, hormone imbalances, deficiencies in certain nutrients, or something more obvious that has happened recently, such as bereavement.

‘I sometimes find that under hypnosis people discover something happened in their lives that they don’t even remember, but which has been making them feel bad ever since.’

We still live in a society where depression is a taboo. ‘People still aren’t good about discussing their feelings, and if you confide in someone who doesn’t react well it can make things even worse,’ Caroline continues.  ‘You have to get into the mindset that it’s OK to think about your own needs, and recognise that you are on your own path in life and you don’t want to be pulled off it.’
 
Caroline Carr will be holding free talks at this year’s Vitality Show (London’s Earls Court 2, 22nd-25th March) entitled ‘Zippy Women’ in the One Life Theatre on Friday at 2:30pm and Saturday at 1:30pm. She will also be holding a workshop entitled ‘How Not to Worry’ on Saturday at 11am. For tickets and further information please see www.vitalitylive.co.uk

See Healthy Soul’s article: Coping with Depression

Live long, stay young and be healthy

Up to five million people are stressed by work and as many as 9.8 million working days were lost due to stress in the year 2009/10, according to a Health and Safety Executive survey. While most of this stress is described as work-related, in reality there are often many other contributing factors.

Stress is a fact of life so it’s impossible to avoid it. The only answer is to find ways of coping with it better, but it’s easier to start to build up our strength and ability to cope when we’re having a good time. Once everything appears to have gone wrong it’s incredibly difficult to be positive and try something new.

Experts agree that there are various ways of relieving stress:

  • Leading a sociable life and having good friends;
  • Having at least one person to confide in;
  • Plenty of exercise and time outdoors;
  • Healthy eating and avoiding junk foods which actually sap the brain;
  • Talking to a counsellor or stress management trainer;
  • Having regular massage;
  • Not overdoing alcohol intake;
  • Relaxation techniques and meditation;
  • Yoga and t’ai chi relax the mind.

Read Frances Ive’s book: Stress – The Essential Guide, £8.99, print or ebook from http://www.need2knowbooks.co.uk

Relaxation and Meditation

Twenty minutes of meditation a day is said to be equivalent to a night’s sleep so practising it every day makes you less tired, more full of energy, healthier and improves memory and concentration.

  • It prolongs the body’s anabolic process of cell production, growth and repair and reduces the decaying process.
  • It is believed to reduce blood pressure and it is claimed that if a roomful of people are meditating, anyone who passes by will also experience a slight drop in blood pressure levels!

Transcendental Meditation involves sitting quietly for 10 to 20 minutes with eyes closed and focusing on a mantra – a word in the ancient Sanskrit language – which is endlessly repeated to attempt to get the mind to still.

Some people can do this by just counting one on an in breath and two on the out breath, but most find that it takes some time before thoughts stop interrupting!

According to The Sivananda Book of Meditation, ‘After the age of thirty-five our brain cells die off at a rate of 100,000 a day; meditation reduces this decline, preventing or minimising senility.’

Relaxation Techniques

There are other ways to relax too:

  • Sit down and close your eyes for 10 to 20 minutes every day, and imagine a favourite place by the sea, in the mountains, or wherever, to refresh mind and body
  • Buy one of the many relaxation CDs to talk you into a relaxed state
  • Transcendental Meditation-National Communications Office, 08705 143733
Featured Products
The Sivananda Book of Meditation Gaia £14.99
*** Please click here to order these products from the Nutri Centre ***

The Transcendental Meditation-National Communications Office, 08705 143733, www.t-m.org.uk

London Meditation Centre, www.londonmeditationcentre.com


Yoga
 
 
Inner calm and a perfect body are just two of the claims made for yoga, but in reality you don’t have to be Geri Halliwell or Madonna to benefit. Yoga suits people of all ages and sizes, and if you’re not supple it’s an even better reason to do it.
  • The roots of yoga go back thousands of years in Indian culture;
  • It is integral to the Ayurvedic system of medicine which has a holistic approach rather than a purely medical one;
  • The word yoga means union in Sanskrit, as its aim is to unite mind, body and spirit for health and wellbeing.

In a typical yoga class there are a number of different postures performed while standing, lying and sitting, as well as breathing exercises, meditation and deep relaxation.

Physical postures are designed to tone and strengthen muscles, stretch the body, improve the functioning of all internal organs and the cardiovascular system. They help you to

  • concentrate the mind;
  • sharpen the intellect;
  • attain inner peace;
  • and improve posture and balance.

The amazing popularity of yoga is reflected by the different types now available, the most common of which are Astanga, Iyengar, Sivananda, Hatha, Satyananda, but they are all based on the same concept and have similar far-reaching benefits.

Yoga enthusiasts claim that their body becomes supple and flexible, and that they can cope with stress better. Instead of becoming stiff and finding movement more difficult as they grow older, they feel fit and healthy and more in control of their mobility.

Yoga for Health

Joy Mankoo of the former organisation Yoga for Health which used to run courses and does remedial yoga for those with MS, cancer, ME, arthritis, cancer, breathing problems and Parkinson’s, explains:

Yoga relieves stress and calms the mind, improves muscle tone and posture and exercises the joints. Because of emotional and mental stress many people aren’t breathing well and their diaphragm does not move freely.

‘Stress becomes stuck in the muscles making them tight. In yoga full respiration is restored through both the breathing and stretching exercises. Breathing naturally and fully improves the flow of energy, relieves pressure on the chest and enables more air to be drawn into the lungs. Blood is naturally drawn back to the heart encouraging the circulation of blood and lymph, while slow, calm breathing also has the effect of calming the mind.’

British Wheel of Yoga, 01529 303233, www.bwy.org.uk


T’ai chi

Millions of Chinese people have been practising t’ai chi for centuries and they believe that it rejuvenates them and leads to a prolonged life. In the west it has gained in popularity as we struggle to find ways of dealing with our stressful lives.

  • T’ai chi means literally supreme ultimate which indicates the spiritual level which people practising it hope to achieve!
  • Originally a martial art it is frequently practised in a non-aggressive but gentle therapeutic way, as well as a method of self-defence;
  • Both t’ai chi and chi kung – which is similar but aimed specifically at improving health – consist of a series of graceful movements or ‘forms’.

The forms help to relax and calm the mind, body and soul, while gently toning muscles, improving balance and posture, boosting circulation and reducing stress. The slow gentle movements stimulate the body’s energy or chi, massage the meridians – the lines which run through the body in the acupuncture system, and give a complete inner and outer workout.

Linda Chase Broda, teacher of t’ai chi, explains, ‘Traditionally the doctor and the kung fu master in Chinese and other eastern cultures were one and the same and t’ai chi was associated with keeping healthy, energising and repairing the body.

‘The slow rhythmic movements performed in a long sequence allow the body to resonate with its own natural rhythm, heartbeat and breath. The gentle exercises stimulate circulation, but not at a fast pace like aerobics but more at a normal pace as if walking across the street.

Both T’ai chi with its long series of movements and Chi Kung with its shorter movements concentrate the mind, bringing awareness into the functioning and process of the body and begin to promote relaxation and a feeling of wholeness. Movements are not physically strenuous so you can start practising at any age and carry on forever.’

Linda claims that the gentle and graceful movements of T’ai Chi and Chi Kung:

  • Maintain suppleness and mobility of the joints;
  • Help to improve balance and stability which deteriorates with age – particularly helpful in fall prevention;
  • Are very good for concentration and untangling the mind – because you have to focus the mind and remember what comes next.

Linda Chase Broda is Course Director at the Tai Chi and Chi Kung Forum for Health and Special Needs, Manchester

For details of practitioners contact: T’ai Chi UK, 0207 407 4775, www.taichifinder.co.uk


Flower Remedies

There are a whole range of Bach Flower Remedies that help people to deal with difficult emotions, and they can provide a way of coping without the need for antidepressants. There are now plenty more flower essences and remedies from around the world, including Australian Bush Flower remedies to help cope with emotions.

The original flower remedies were developed by Sir Edward Bach to help people cope with a range of emotions. They are homeopathically prepared from plants and flowers and they help to balance negative thoughts and feelings which bring people down.

  • Star of Bethlehem is for times of grief and great unhappiness due to a shock or trauma;
  • Oak is for people who are struggling on in the face of adversity but need to be strong because others depend on them;
  • Sweet Chestnut helps to relieve extreme feelings of distress which seem absolutely unbearable;
  • Elm is for when someone feels that they are doing their best but they don’t feel that they can carry on;
  • Larch is for anyone who lacks confidence and needs a boost.
Featured Products
Star of Bethlehem Bach Flower Remedy Bach Flower Remedies 20ml £5.95
Sweet Chestnut Bach Flower Remedies 20ml £5.95
Elm Bach Flower Remedies 20ml £5.95
Efamol Chewies Efamol 30 £4.99
Oak Bach Flower Remedy Bach Flower Remedies 20ml £5.95
*** Please click here to order these products from the Nutri Centre ***

Relax, relax, relax

N2K_Stress_2011_6mmStress is at epidemic levels. Health and Safety Executive Research shows that stress accounts for half of all working days lost each year, costing employers £26 billion a year.

A survey for Mind suggests that one in 11 British workers has been to the GP for stress and anxiety from the financial squeeze.

Stress is unavoidable

Stress is a fact of life so it’s impossible to avoid it. The only answer is to find ways of coping with it better, but it’s easier to start to build up our strength and ability to cope when we’re having a good time. Once everything appears to have gone wrong it’s incredibly difficult to be positive and try something new.  See also Are You Stressed?

Experts agree that there are various ways of relieving stress:

  • Leading a sociable life and having good friends;
  • Having at least one person to confide in;
  • Plenty of exercise and time outdoors;
  • Healthy eating and avoiding junk foods which actually sap the brain;
  • Talking to a counsellor or stress management trainer;
  • Having regular massage;
  • Not overdoing alcohol intake;
  • Relaxation techniques and meditation;
  • Yoga and t’ai chi relax the mind.

Learning to relax

Twenty minutes of meditation a day is said to be equivalent to a night’s sleep so practising it every day makes you less tired, more full of energy, healthier and improves memory and concentration.

  • It prolongs the body’s anabolic process of cell production, growth and repair and reduces the decaying process;
  • It is believed to reduce blood pressure and it is claimed that if a roomful of people are meditating, anyone who passes by will also experience a slight drop in blood pressure levels!

Transcendental Meditation involves sitting quietly for 10 to 20 minutes with eyes closed and focusing on a mantra – a word in the ancient Sanskrit language – which is endlessly repeated to attempt to get the mind to still.

Some people can do this by just counting one on an in breath and two on the out breath, but most find that it takes some time before thoughts stop interrupting!

According to The Sivananda Book of Meditation, ‘After the age of thirty-five our brain cells die off at a rate of 100,000 a day; meditation reduces this decline, preventing or minimising senility.’

Read the book Stress – The Essential Guide by Frances Ive, £8.99 from www.need2knowbooks.co.uk  

Relaxation Techniques

  • Sit down and close your eyes for 10 to 20 minutes every day, and imagine a favourite place by the sea, in the mountains, or wherever, to refresh mind and body
  • Buy one of the many relaxation CDs to talk you into a relaxed state

Yoga

Inner calm and a perfect body are just two of the claims made for yoga, but in reality you don’t have to be Geri Halliwell or Madonna to benefit. Yoga suits people of all ages and sizes, and if you’re not supple it’s an even better reason to do it. It’s not competitive and you do everything taking into account your own ability, rather than trying to achieve.

  • The roots of yoga go back thousands of years in Indian culture;
  • It is integral to the Ayurvedic system of medicine which has a holistic approach rather than a purely medical one;
  • The word yoga means union in Sanskrit, as its aim is to unite mind, body and spirit for health and wellbeing.

In a typical yoga class there are a number of different postures performed while standing, lying and sitting, as well as breathing exercises, meditation and deep relaxation.

Physical postures are designed to tone and strengthen muscles, stretch the body, improve the functioning of all internal organs and the cardiovascular system. They help you to

  • concentrate the mind
  • sharpen the intellect
  • attain inner peace
  • and improve posture and balance.

The amazing popularity of yoga is reflected by the different types now available, the most common of which are Astanga, Iyengar, Sivananda, Hatha, Satyananda, but they are all based on the same concept and have similar far-reaching benefits.

Yoga enthusiasts claim that their body becomes supple and flexible, and that they can cope with stress better. Instead of becoming stiff and finding movement more difficult as they grow older, they feel fit and healthy and more in control of their mobility.

Yoga for Health

Joy Mankoo of the former organisation Yoga for Health which used to run courses and does remedial yoga for those with MS, cancer, ME, arthritis, cancer, breathing problems and Parkinson’s, explains:

‘Yoga relieves stress and calms the mind, improves muscle tone and posture and exercises the joints. Because of emotional and mental stress many people aren’t breathing well and their diaphragm does not move freely.

‘Stress becomes stuck in the muscles making them tight. In yoga full respiration is restored through both the breathing and stretching exercises. Breathing naturally and fully improves the flow of energy, relieves pressure on the chest and enables more air to be drawn into the lungs. Blood is naturally drawn back to the heart encouraging the circulation of blood and lymph, while slow, calm breathing also has the effect of calming the mind.’

British Wheel of Yoga, 01529 303233, www.bwy.org.uk

T’ai chi

Chinese people have been practising t’ai chi for centuries and they believe that it is rejuvenates them and leads to a prolonged life. In the west it has gained in popularity as we struggle to find ways of dealing with our stressful lives.

  • T’ai chi means literally supreme ultimate which indicates the spiritual level which people practising it hope to achieve
  • Originally a martial art it is frequently practised in a non-aggressive but gentle therapeutic way, as well as a method of self-defence
  • Both t’ai chi and chi kung – which is similar but aimed specifically at improving health – consist of a series of graceful movements or ‘forms’.

The forms help to relax and calm the mind, body and soul, while gently toning muscles, improving balance and posture, boosting circulation and reducing stress. The slow gentle movements stimulate the body’s energy or chi, massage the meridians – the lines which run through the body in the acupuncture system, and give a complete inner and outer workout.

Linda Chase Broda, teacher of t’ai chi, explains, ‘Traditionally the doctor and the kung fu master in Chinese and other eastern cultures were one and the same and t’ai chi was associated with keeping healthy, energising and repairing the body.

‘The slow rhythmic movements performed in a long sequence allow the body to resonate with its own natural rhythm, heartbeat and breath. The gentle exercises stimulate circulation, but not at a fast pace like aerobics but more at a normal pace as if walking across the street.

‘Both T’ai chi with its long series of movements and Chi Kung with its shorter movements concentrate the mind, bringing awareness into the functioning and process of the body and begin to promote relaxation and a feeling of wholeness. Movements are not physically strenuous so you can start practising at any age and carry on forever.’

Linda claims that the gentle and graceful movements of T’ai Chi and Chi Kung:

  • Maintain suppleness and mobility of the joints;
  • Help to improve balance and stability which deteriorates with age – particularly helpful in fall prevention;
  • Are very good for concentration and untangling the mind – because you have to focus the mind and remember what comes next.

Linda Chase Broda is Course Director at the Tai Chi and Chi Kung Forum for Health and Special Needs, Manchester

For details of practitioners contact: T’ai Chi UK, 0207 407 4775, www.taichifinder.co.uk

Flower Remedies

There are a whole range of Bach Flower Remedies that help people to deal with difficult emotions, and they can provide a way of coping without the need for antidepressants. There are now plenty more flower essences and remedies from around the world, including Australian Bush Flower remedies to help cope with emotions.

The original flower remedies were developed by Sir Edward Bach to help people cope with a range of emotions. They are homeopathically prepared from plants and flowers and they help to balance negative thoughts and feelings which bring people down.

Sceptics should try Rescue Remedy and see how it instantly calms you down!

  • Star of Bethlehem is for times of grief and great unhappiness due to a shock or trauma;
  • Oak is for people who are struggling on in the face of adversity but need to be strong because others depend on them;
  • Sweet Chestnut helps to relieve extreme feelings of distress which seem absolutely unbearable;
  • Elm is for when someone feels that they are doing their best but they don’t feel that they can carry on;
  • Larch is for anyone who lacks confidence and needs a boost.
Featured Products
Star of Bethlehem Bach Flower Remedy Bach Flower Remedies 20ml £6.40
Sweet Chestnut Bach Flower Remedies 20ml £6.40
Elm Bach Flower Remedies 20ml £6.40
Rescue Remedy Pastilles Bach Flower Remedies 50g £5.65
Oak Bach Flower Remedies 20ml £6.40
*** Please click here to order these products from Nutricentre ***