Spotlight on seeds for November

Seeds NovemberSeeds are probably more nutrient-dense than any other food – after all, they contain everything a plant needs to grow to maturity. They are rich in protein, essential fatty acids, fibre, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals. Here are just a few reasons why my recipes this month are all about seeds, writes Dr Susan Aldridge, freelance writer and editor based in London, with an interest in medicine, health, science and food/nutrition.

• Pumpkin seeds ¬ – rich in zinc
• Chia seeds ¬– high in fibre
• Linseeds or flax seeds ¬– an excellent source of alpha-linolenic acid, which is important for cardiovascular health
• Sunflower seeds ¬– a good source of vitamin E
• Hemp seeds – contain a healthy 3:1 ratio of omega-6: omega-3 fatty acids.

Along with the seeds themselves, sprouting seeds are also rich in nutrients. High in protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals, they are useful for adding texture to salads, soups and pasta dishes.

Hemp and raspberry smoothie
Three types of seeds in one delicious pink smoothie. Hemp seed milk is made from pulverized hemp seeds blended with water – it’s creamier than nut milks and worth a try if you’re experimenting with non-dairy milks.

Serves one
One carton of raspberries
One tsp. ground linseeds
One tsp. chia seeds
One tsp. cacao powder
Half tsp. matcha
One tsp. turmeric latte powder
Hemp seed milk.

Mix all ingredients, using enough hemp seed milk to make a smoothie of your desired consistency. How many seeds can you pack into a juice?

Insalata tricolore with pumpkin and sunflower seeds

This dish is inspired by a delicious snack I had in a café recently – avocado on sourdough toast, sprinkled with pumpkin seeds. The smoothness of the avocado contrasts very nicely with the crunch of the seeds. So, I’ve translated this idea into one of my favourite Italian dishes – insalata tricolore.

Serves two
One large avocado, sliced
Six tomatoes, sliced
100g mozzarella or burrata, sliced
One tub of sundried tomatoes
One tbsp. pumpkin seeds
One tbsp. sunflower seeds
Olives (optional)
Fresh basil leaves
Flax seed oil, balsamic vinegar to dress

The classic way of serving this dish is to layer the green, white and red elegantly together – but you could just mix them up. Add a bit of extra interest by scattering sundried tomatoes on the top, then the seeds. Finish with the torn basil and a drizzle of flax seed oil (more seeds!) and balsamic vinegar (for that real Italian flavour). You could also add in some olives to make it extra special!

Sprouts, seeds and salad

This is super healthy. A recent study showed that regular consumption of asparagus improved insulin production and lowered blood glucose – so could help protect against Type 2 diabetes. And I don’t need to remind you of the health benefits of broccoli. Combined with seeds, sprouts and a flax seed oil dressing, this salad ticks all the boxes…

Serves two
Two bunches of asparagus
Two bunches of tenderstem broccoli
One tbsp. mixed seeds
Two handfuls of mixed sprouts (alfalfa, broccoli, mung bean and so on)
Dressing: one clove of garlic, crushed with herbed rock salt to a puree, then whisked with flax seed oil and lemon juice
Cook the broccoli and asparagus, set aside to cool and chop into small pieces. Mix with the seeds and sprouts, then dress with the oil and lemon mixture.
Next month: Some Winter comfort food

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