Bad weather affects our joints

Courtesy of Daoudi Aissa
Courtesy of Daoudi Aissa

It’s not just an old wives’ tale that you can forecast the weather by the pains in your joints.  It’s true.  While researching my book, One Step Ahead of Osteoarthritis  (by Frances Ive, which focuses on staying active  to stay mobile and happy , the following research showed that a  10 degree drop in temperature and also a fall  in barometric pressure affected people’s joints.

Scientists carried out a study at Tufts University, Boston, of 200 people of around 60 years old with osteoarthritis of the knee over a three month period[1]. They concluded that changes in barometric pressure and ambient temperature are independently associated with osteoarthritis knee pain severity. Every 10 degree drop in temperature was also linked to an increase in arthritis pain.

It may actually be the lowering of barometric pressure that affect people the most – not the pressure itself. Scientists carried out a study at Tufts University, Boston, of 200 people of around 60 years old with osteoarthritis of the knee over a three month period[1]. They concluded that changes in barometric pressure and ambient temperature are independently associated with osteoarthritis knee pain severity. Every 10 degree drop in temperature was also linked to an increase in arthritis pain.

Now , new research from Regenovex®[2] – a unique science backed supplement to help support bone health and muscle function for people leading active lives, found that many people were aware of the relationship between the weather and their aches and pains.

• Nearly three in five (57%) say that the cold is the type of weather that most affects their joints, bones and muscles
• For 38% of the nation, the damp causes health miseries for the body’s network of muscles, joints and bones
• Rain for 27% of people plays havoc with their bones, joints and muscles.

One Step Ahead of Osteoarthritis, Frances Ive, Hammersmith Health Books, is available at Waterstones,

Amazon, and independent book stores.

 

[1] McAlindon T1Formica MSchmid CHFletcher J. Changes in barometric pressure and ambient temperature influence osteoarthritis pain. Am J Med. 2007 May;120(5):429-34.

[2] Global Ginger Comms; Autumn 2020; data on file.

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